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Thanksgiving & Historical Hair

I’m not sure if “Happy” is the correct word to put with “Thanksgiving” this year. I think many of us are so tired, beaten down, depressed or angry for one reason or another that while we’re thankful to have survived this far, a lot of us probably still aren’t all that “happy”.

That said, we have survived this far, and there’s light at the end of the tunnel, so while it may be a ways off yet, we can make it. We just have to keep slogging along, and do the one thing that seems to be the most difficult for humans to do – stay away from each other for a little while longer.

Admittedly, I don’t really have an issue with that like a lot of people, so it’s really not a hardship for me to eschew family gatherings and such. Honestly, it’s kind of a convenient excuse. I’ll be spending Thanksgiving with just my husband this year, and making a nice dinner tailored to our own tastes. Nothing to complain about as far as that goes.

In other news, I’ve recently become fascinated with historical hairstyles/styling. The thing about growing your hair out is, if you don’t focus on the goal, you are pretty constantly tempted to chop the whole thing off again during the awkward “in between” stages of growth. I’ve been buying fun hair accessories and even pony tail holders in anticipation of my hair being long enough to use them, and one day a couple of weeks ago, I stumbled upon a YouTube channel of a historian demonstrating how to care for hair during…the Edwardian period, maybe? I can’t remember really, but it started my spiral down into the world of historical hair care and styling, and I’ve been watching similar videos every since. Here’s a different hair video I watched this weekend…fun and fascinating, methinks!

Needless to say, the wait for long enough hair to braid (or “plait”) again is even more excruciating while I watch because I want to “play” too, but also something I’m really looking forward to. A few more months and I should be able to do quite a bit more with my own mop.

I got very little writing in last week, and that’s something I’d really like to change. So along with a really good ham, scalloped potatoes & sweet potato pie dinner this week, I’d like to get some words in consistently. With any luck, I’ll hit four mornings out of five, and have another fun something for Friday.

Until then, I do wish you the happiest Thanksgiving you can possibly have.


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Feathers, Fur, & Other Things

Last week I watched a flock of blue jays flutter through our yard on their way to who knows where. I think that’s the first time I’ve ever seen a blue jay, much less several of them. They reminded me of our finches, always moving, always bobbing, always looking around and flitting somewhere else. Very busy little birds, and oh-so-pretty. I think they know it, too.

I also watched squirrels playing in the neighbor’s trees (mostly making sure Murphy didn’t get too energetic and decide to jump the fence while they taunted him from above). They’re so cute, scurrying around the branches, stopping for a quick wrestling match, chasing each other around and then practically flying to the next tree. Cheeky little things love to sit up in the trees or on the power lines and chatter at the dogs, lecturing them for barking and holding their ground (so to speak) against the big, apparently not-so-scary monsters below.

Another bushy-tailed dude was hiding wares in the front yard, digging holes and covering them back up, most likely to forget what he put where over the winter. And a large, well-insulated bunny was mocking the tiny yapper-dogs in one of the neighbor’s yards, sitting there under the lilac bushes not 10 feet away from pups that are smaller than he is. I can’t imagine he was enjoying the noise he created (I know I sure wasn’t), but he did seem kind of proud of the ruckus, and completely unwilling to give up his cozy spot.

I haven’t seen our wild turkeys around lately, but that probably makes sense given the season. Not that you could legally shoot one in the city limits (I don’t think, anyways), but still…probably best to stay hidden this time of year.

All this was an entertaining and, contradictory as it seems, almost relaxing backdrop for a busy and very “people-filled” work week. It was also the week in which my grandpa was hospitalized and died after a two year (or so) decline in both physical and mental capabilities. He lived a long life (he was in his late eighties) – a good, simple, rural life, and while it’s never fun to say goodbye to someone like that, I’m glad the end was relatively quick and that he didn’t suffer. The funeral is next Saturday, and after that, I’ll share a little more about his life and how it affected mine. I’m certainly a better person for having had him in my life, especially during my younger, more formative years.

Coincidentally, the day my mom called to tell me Gramps was in the hospital on end-of-life care was the day I sent the first cookbook I ever had home with a co-worker for his daughter. She wants to learn how to cook, and neither of her parents like cooking all that much, but they are always very supportive of their girls. That cookbook was a Christmas present to me in 1983 (I was 8yrs old) from my grandparents, so underneath their signature to me, I added my own wishes and the date for my co-worker’s daughter. Hopefully someday she’ll pass it along as well, either to her own kids or some other youngster who wants to learn to cook.

This week will be another busy, disjointed one, with work Mon – Weds, and Thanksgiving with my in-laws on Thursday, and then one more undoubtedly very calm day at work before the funeral on Saturday. I’ve always liked working the Friday after Thanksgiving. I’m not a shopper, and I like being in the office when things are quiet, most everyone else is gone and I can just focus and work at my own pace without being interrupted every half hour or less. In my younger years, it was also a good excuse to escape the family for awhile – my introverted self needed the time alone to recharge between the large family gatherings that holidays tend to require (some years multiple families on the same day – we’ve since put a stop to that, for the most part). That will be the case this year too, it would seem.

Whether you’re celebrating here in the states or just heading into another normal week everywhere else – here’s to thankful hearts, good memories, lasting legacies, and peaceful endings.